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COVID-19: America’s Deadliest Pandemic Surpassing the 1918 Flu

COVID-19: America’s Deadliest Pandemic Surpassing the 1918 Flu

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COVID-19 is now the most fatal outbreak in present U.S. history. It is going back to the estimated U.S. fatalities from the 1918 influenza pandemic. This is according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

COVID-19 Fatalities are Rising

On Monday, there was a reported U.S. death due to COVID-19 that crossed 675,000. In fact, they are rising at an average of more than 1,900 fatalities per day. This is according to John Hopkins data shows. Moreover, the nation is presenting experiencing yet another wave of new infections. That is “supposedly” fueled by the fast-spreading delta variant.

Three Waves of 1918 Flu

It came in three waves that are the 1918 flu. The flu occurred in the spring of 1918, the fall of 1918, and the winter and spring of 1919. It killed approximately 675,000 Americans. This is according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Up until now, it was considered America’s most lethal pandemic in current history up until now.

COVID-19 Historical Comparisons

“We have done very well done with historical comparisons,” said Dr. Howard Markel. He is a physician and medical historian at the University of Michigan. Markel says it is time to stop looking back to 1918 as a guide for how to act in the present. Then go ahead and start really thinking forward from 2021.

“I will be studying and teaching to the next generation of doctors and public-health students regarding this pandemic,” he said.

There is going to be a direct side-by-side comparison of the raw numbers for each pandemic. However, that doesn’t provide all the contexts. Including the many technological, medical, social, and cultural advances over the past century. This is what Market and other health experts.

Population, Outbreaks and Disasters

It’s important to consider population when talking about outbreaks or disasters, health experts and statisticians say.

The U.S. population was less than a third of today’s with approximately 103 million that are living in America

In 1918, for example, the U.S. population was less than a third of today with roughly 103 million people living in America just before the infamous roaring 1920s. Today, there are nearly 330 million people living in the U.S. It means the 1918 flu killed about 1 in every 150 Americans. In fact, this is compared with 1 in 500 who did die from COVID-19 so far.

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