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Rest Hours Extended For Tired Drivers

Rest Hours Extended For Tired Drivers

Rest has been on the minds of one of the hardest working industries in America. A multitude of factors have led the trucking industry to overextend their drivers. Now, a necessary step has been made for drivers who are facing the harsh realities of a global pandemic.

Rest For the Weary

The trucking industry has had one of the toughest times during this pandemic. With the previous trucking crisis combined with COVID-19, drivers have been facing a double-whammy.

Prior to COVID-19, the trucking industry was facing hardship on their own. Many experienced and skilled drivers had reached the age of retirement. Their years of service plus their endeavors to achieve a comfortable life are paying off.

This left a drastic hole as companies scrambled to fill the large level of rapidly emptying slots. Truck drivers who are currently on the road have to work extra to make up for it. On top of that, a lack of interest in the industry made it difficult for businesses to find capable and skilled drivers for their fleet.

Then COVID-19 Hit

With the already extended service for drivers across the country, they had to work double-time in order to provide the country with the essential products to keep both people safe, and the industry moving. Some drivers worked 14+ hours a day to make sure America remained safe.

The effects have put a drastic strain on the industry for both drivers and businesses. Not only that, but the industry is losing thousands of jobs.

FMCSA Relaxes On Drivers Hours To Adequately Rest Drivers

  • The Agency will increase safety and flexibility for the 30-minute break rule by requiring a break after 8 hours of consecutive driving and allowing the break to be satisfied by a driver using on-duty, not driving status, rather than off-duty status.
  • An Agency will modify the sleeper-berth exception to allow drivers to split their required 10 hours off duty into two periods: an 8/2 split, or a 7/3 split—with neither period counting against the driver’s 14‑hour driving window.
  • The Agency will modify the adverse driving conditions exception by extending by two hours the maximum window during which driving is permitted.
  • An Agency will change the short-haul exception available to certain commercial drivers by lengthening the drivers’ maximum on‑duty period from 12 to 14 hours and extending the distance limit within which the driver may operate from 100 air miles to 150 air miles.

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